©

petitepasserine:

white women of hollywood, reducing japan and japanese culture to cupcakes, sexy ”costumes” and submissive sex-kittens since god knows when




thesassycat:

sluttybitch2007:

The rest of the space is going to be pretty pissed when they see this. 

did you google how to take a screen shot

thesassycat:

sluttybitch2007:

The rest of the space is going to be pretty pissed when they see this. 

did you google how to take a screen shot




9 versions of Morning on the Seine, by Claude Oscar Monet

c. 1897




goatwing:

*prints this tweet, rolls a cigarette with it, and puts it between my teeth without lighting it*

goatwing:

*prints this tweet, rolls a cigarette with it, and puts it between my teeth without lighting it*




nitratediva:

Buster Keaton in The Three Ages of Facepalm (sorta).





Grégoire Colin"What I love about working with Claire is that she lets the actor imbue the character with everything he is at a given moment. She never gives orders; she offers a critique of what she’s seen."
Jim Jarmusch"Her films can be very poetic, but they’re never precious. They can be very funny but never silly or dumb. Somehow they remain observational, always. And the camera, it’s like music that never has extra notes in it that aren’t needed."
Isaach De Bankolé"I met Claire a long time ago, back in 1987 when she was about to do her first feature Chocolat. When I read Chocolat, I was surprised that it was written by a white girl from France. When I read it, it sounded like someone who really knows how the blood circulates in the African body. She leaves a lot of room for input and improvisation but at the same time, she really knows what she wants… I’ve been very blessed to meet these people and to work with them because they have a special vision, whether it’s Claire Denis or Jim Jarmusch. When they write for the black they don’t write because they’re black they write for the character and that’s the difference between them and many other directors. It’s a pleasure to work for a director who has that vision and who can at the same time have trust in me.”
Alex Descas"I think that she has a great attention to detail and a very particular way of filming and shooting. She tries to capture everything from the décor to the character’s precise body movement… but also gives actors the freedom to interpret their characters. One might even say that in her own way, Claire is a choreographer."
Chiara Mastroianni"Despite the violence or the despair of what she’s shooting, the way she shoots it is always with love. Even when Claire gets really dark, there’s so much light in her."
Agnès Godard"Claire has a very honed relationship with the images that has evolved over time. She has the faith and the belief that an association of ideas that’s concise and that is based on pure cinematography—the choice of a frame, a focal point, the climate of the light—says something, and the idea that gluing those images together is going to create a sense."
Isabelle Huppert"The way she works is the way she lives. Working with Claire, you have to be really available—you have to let yourself go into her rhythm. She’s very creative. She’s like a painter. She gives me the feeling that she has a vision and you have to be the witness to that vision. You don’t want to ask her too direct questions—’Why do you do this?’ ‘What do you have in mind?’—these things I would never ask her. You just have to trust her and follow her."
Stuart Staples"When we made the music for Nénette et Boni, we made it like a band watching a film and then decorating it, giving it texture. A few years later, on the next film we worked on, I said to Claire, ‘I’ve realized I don’t really know how to make music for films,’ and she said, ‘That’s all right, I don’t know how to make films.’ I think that has been the basis of our work together—fundamentally we don’t know what we are doing, but we do know what we hear, what we see and what we feel, and we take it from there. Claire is always looking for a reaction to what she is making—she gives people she works with the freedom to appraise what she is doing.”

Grégoire Colin
"What I love about working with Claire is that she lets the actor imbue the character with everything he is at a given moment. She never gives orders; she offers a critique of what she’s seen."

Jim Jarmusch
"Her films can be very poetic, but they’re never precious. They can be very funny but never silly or dumb. Somehow they remain observational, always. And the camera, it’s like music that never has extra notes in it that aren’t needed."

Isaach De Bankolé
"I met Claire a long time ago, back in 1987 when she was about to do her first feature Chocolat. When I read Chocolat, I was surprised that it was written by a white girl from France. When I read it, it sounded like someone who really knows how the blood circulates in the African body. She leaves a lot of room for input and improvisation but at the same time, she really knows what she wants… I’ve been very blessed to meet these people and to work with them because they have a special vision, whether it’s Claire Denis or Jim Jarmusch. When they write for the black they don’t write because they’re black they write for the character and that’s the difference between them and many other directors. It’s a pleasure to work for a director who has that vision and who can at the same time have trust in me.”

Alex Descas
"I think that she has a great attention to detail and a very particular way of filming and shooting. She tries to capture everything from the décor to the character’s precise body movement… but also gives actors the freedom to interpret their characters. One might even say that in her own way, Claire is a choreographer."

Chiara Mastroianni
"Despite the violence or the despair of what she’s shooting, the way she shoots it is always with love. Even when Claire gets really dark, there’s so much light in her."

Agnès Godard
"Claire has a very honed relationship with the images that has evolved over time. She has the faith and the belief that an association of ideas that’s concise and that is based on pure cinematography—the choice of a frame, a focal point, the climate of the light—says something, and the idea that gluing those images together is going to create a sense."

Isabelle Huppert
"The way she works is the way she lives. Working with Claire, you have to be really available—you have to let yourself go into her rhythm. She’s very creative. She’s like a painter. She gives me the feeling that she has a vision and you have to be the witness to that vision. You don’t want to ask her too direct questions—’Why do you do this?’ ‘What do you have in mind?’—these things I would never ask her. You just have to trust her and follow her."

Stuart Staples
"When we made the music for Nénette et Boni, we made it like a band watching a film and then decorating it, giving it texture. A few years later, on the next film we worked on, I said to Claire, ‘I’ve realized I don’t really know how to make music for films,’ and she said, ‘That’s all right, I don’t know how to make films.’ I think that has been the basis of our work together—fundamentally we don’t know what we are doing, but we do know what we hear, what we see and what we feel, and we take it from there. Claire is always looking for a reaction to what she is making—she gives people she works with the freedom to appraise what she is doing.”




About Cersei and Jaime 

jaimelannister:

racefortheironthrone:

stannisisthefury - so according to Alex Graves (source): 

"Well, it becomes consensual by the end, because anything for them ultimately results in a turn-on, especially a power struggle. Nobody really wanted to talk about what was going on between the two characters, so we had a rehearsal that was a blocking rehearsal. And it was very much about the earlier part with Charles (Dance) and the gentle verbal kidnapping of Cersei’s last living son. Nikolaj came in and we just went through one physical progression and digression of what they went through, but also how to do it with only one hand, because it was Nikolaj. By the time you do that and you walk through it, the actors feel comfortable going home to think about it. The only other thing I did was that ordinarily, you rehearse the night before, and I wanted to rehearse that scene four days before, so that we could think about everything. And it worked out really well. That’s one of my favorite scenes I’ve ever done." 

wow. in my opinion this is even more disturbing than the scene itself. this is not just about turning a consensual scene into a rape scene, this is the director NOT EVEN REALIZING he turned it into a rape scene. this is the director talking about a woman saying ‘no stop right now, it’s not right’ repeatedly while crying and trying to fight the other person off while the man thrusts into her saying ‘i don’t care’ and having the nerve to call it consensual, because ‘power struggles are a turn-on for them’, because ‘anything for them results in a turn-on’,  like being turned on by powerplay is making this scene consensual, like being turned on anyway by whatever they do makes this scene consensual. well im sorry to inform you mister director but THERE’S A HUGE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN CONSENSUAL SEX AND RAPE AND THE KEYWORD IS CONSENT. AND THERE WASN’T ANY CONSENT IN THIS SCENE.




sadqueerpunk:

endlesssorcererushiromiya:

sadqueerpunk:

i think it’s so cute when straight people think they’ve never met a queer person. that’s adorable. you’re adorable.

I think it’s cute when people blame straight people for being born.

you’re right!! that’s exactly what i said in my post!!! reading comprehension a+ i’m so proud




fornaxed:

honorobblestark:

because this was removed. all credit for the idea goes to first poster

THEY WEREN’T EVEN ENTITLED TO COPYRIGHT SOMETHING THAT’S LITERALLY JUST CLIPS FROM THE SHOW




stupidswampwitch:

masooood:

safeidgul:

Why can’t there be a male hooter’s equivalent where male servers are shirtless and highly sexualized for their bodies and looks

Male Strip clubs. You’re thinking of male strip clubs.

No. Not a male strip club. A strip club is a strip club. I want a place called Cahones where waiters wear Speedos and are forced to stuff if they don’t fill out their uniform well enough. I want them to giggle for my tips. I want it to be so normalised and engrained in our culture that women bring their daughters there for lunch (because whaaaaaat the wings are good! Geeze sensitive much?) where they’ll give playful little nudges like, “Wouldn’t mind if you dad had those. Heh heh heh.” that their daughters don’t even understand but will absorb and start to assume is just the normal way grown up women talk about grown up men. I want to playfully ask my waiter if I can have extra nuts on my salad and for him to swat my arm with an Oh, you because he knows if he doesn’t his manager will yell at him. I want other men to pretend to like going there so I think they’re cool. I want to go to Cahones during my lunch break at work and when I come back and tell the other women in the office where I went they chuckle slightly and the men around us suddenly feel self conscious and they don’t know why.




tarkovskologist:

"Buy a pair of shoes for Zahra first. Hers are torn."

Children of Heaven 1997 (Bacheha-ye Aseman), dir. Majid Majidi